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Full text of "The Cambridge Natural History"

LYNXES

39

The   Fishing Cat, F. wiverrina, of  India and. Cliina, is abou

3 feet 6 inches including the tail. Its black spots upon a grej
brown ground have a tendency to form longitudinal lines. It i
in fact, on Eimer*s theory, a case of longitudinal stripes breakin
up into spots. It differs from the bulk of Cats by preying upo;
fish, though it is not known how it catches them. It also feed
upon the large snail ^mpullaria. In addition to these there ai
twenty-four species of Cats found in the Old World, mainly In tli
Oriental region, of small to moderate size.

The European Lynx, JF. lynx., has rather long legs, a short tai

FIG. 198. — European Lynx.     JPVia lynx*

and tufted, pointed ears. It han only two premoiars in the nppe-
jaw instead of the usual three. It seems to be doubtful whethe;
the Asiatic Lynx can be distinguished from the European, Im
the Spanish form, jK pardina,, does appear to be distinct, Th<
Common Lynx, sometimes called JF. canadensi®, also ranges intt
America, where some other forms exist, known by the specific
names of F. rufa and F. ftail&vfi.
In America there are altogether sixteen species of Cats, i
we allow three species of Lynx, none of which, however, does
Dr. Mivart allow to be different from the European and Asi&fcl*
Lynx ( F, lyntxi).